My Skin Burns: A Third Person Lupus & Fibromyalgia Story (#HAWMC 25)

Katina, founder of has had lupus for over twenty years. When she saw today’s HAWMC prompt to blog in the third person, she knew she wanted to tell a story but couldn’t figure out which one. She finally decided to tell a cautionary tale about having lupus-related skin problems without the trademark butterfly rash:

Katina has gone to the same lupus specialist since she was 14. But for a long time she lived far away from DC and saw a different set of doctors closer to her new home.

One day Katina noticed that her skin was irritated. It looked fine, with not a blemish or rash in sight, but felt kind of “burny” like she was standing a bit too close to a fireplace. It started happening on her face, then the feeling appeared on her arms, until eventually she would have “painful burning flashes” on different parts of her body. Her doctors couldn’t find anything wrong (and they ran tests of all sorts) and had Katina eliminate everything they could think of to stop the burning. She began washing her clothes in sensitive skin detergent (and double rinsed). She switched to sensitive skin soap, drank massive amounts of water, wore only cotton, tried special creams, etc.

But absolutely nothing helped.

Finally, one of Katina’s doctors got frustrated with her and suggested she see a therapist. Katina was very offended and never went to see that doctor again.

Why? Katina’s very own mother was a counselor and Katina thought that counseling was a great idea for people with lupus who are anxious or depressed. But Katina wasn’t anxious or depressed, she was in pain. How was a therapist going to fix Katina’s painful, burning skin?

The Butterfly Lesson in this story is that this doctor thought Katina’s pain was all in her head just because the doctor couldn’t find an obvious cause or solution. That really upset Katina, so she said adios to the doubting-doctor.  But she didn’t give up on the medical profession. Instead, Katina found a great new doctor who specialized in treating the skin. This dermatologist worked with Katina until the burning eventually stopped. It turned out that the dermatologist was not at all surprised that Katina’s skin burned since Katina had lupus (hello!) and fibromyalgia, which apparently also can present as painful burning skin.

“Central sensitization that is associated with fibromyalgia may be the reason this happens according to some experts. It can present differently for people, sometimes being set off by an allergic response, or tight clothing, or banging into something. Suddenly the skin hurts to touch and the most important thing in the world is to get the instrument that caused the pain removed from the scene. Stripping off clothing that causes discomfort and pain is just one of the reactions a FMS person may have.” Skin Problems by

That incident happened about 10 years ago & Katina still sometimes has burny-skin flares.  Through painful trial and error, Katina has discovered that the burning can be triggered by one or more of the following: the summer (sun exposure), chlorinated pools & hot tubs, non-leather shoes, sequins (really) and synthetic hair. But like before, sometimes Katina’s skin will burn for no apparent reason at all. Such is live in lupus/fibromyalgia land.

Love the Skin You are In (Even if it Burns),

Katina Rae Stapleton

P.S. This blog post was written by Katina Rae Stapleton. While Katina has had lupus and fibromyalgia for over 20 years, she is not a medical professional. If you have any questions about lupus or fibromyalgia, including but not limited to diagnosis, treatment, and living with the disease, you should contact a medical professional.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: Logo

You are commenting using your account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s